Tag Archives: George Clooney

The Win

5 Mar

Wow, thank you. Thanks to the Academy. Like any other human endeavor, making a film can be a transformative experience, and I want to thank Gravity because for many of us involved in this film, it was definitely a transformative experience. And it’s good, because it took so long that if not, it would be like a waste of time. What really sucks is that for a lot of these people, that transformation was wisdom; for me, it was just the color of my hair. I want to share this with all these wise people who made this movie happen: my amazing son and co-writer Jonás Cuarón. Sandra Bullock. Sandy, you’re Gravity. You are the soul, the heart of the film. You’re the most amazing collaborator and one of the best people I ever met. George Clooney, for your absolute trust. David Heyman, Chivo and Tim Webber for making this film happen. The wise guys of Warner Bros., the wise people at Warner Bros., Kevin Tsujihara, Sue Kroll, [unintelligible], Greg Silverman, Lynn Harris, Chris De Faria. And the film took so long that we went through two different administrations, so I have to honor as well Alan Horn and Jeff Robinov. Alejandro González Iñárritu and Guillermo del Toro et Gabriela Rodriguez et Steve Rabineau, Henry Holmes et Jim Berkus, Tracey Jacobs, Cristina, [Spanish] Sheherazade, Bu, Olmo. [Spanish]. Bye, guys.

Transcription c/o the Academy Awards 2014— I’ll fill in the “unintelligible” bits later.

Just because I haven’t been blogging or tweeting these past several months doesn’t mean I haven’t been super excited about all the success and recognition Cuarón, el Chivo, Webber, et al have been experiencing this award season.  In addition to winning this blog’s namesake the Academy Award for Excellence in Cinematic Direction, Gravity also took home the Oscars for Best Cinematography (Emmanuel Lubezki), Best Original Score (Steven Price), Best Sound Editing (Glenn Freemantle), Best Sound Mixing (Skip Lievsay, Niv Adiri, Christopher Benstead, and Chris Munro), Best Film Editing (Alfonso Cuarón and Mark Sanger), and Best Visual Effects (Tim Webber, Chris Lawrence, Dave Shirk, and Neil Corbould).

You can watch the full video of the presentation and acceptance of the award here [Perez Hilton].

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October update

11 Oct

In my last post, optimistic-but-ultimately-naïve that I would get to see Gravity from the TIFF rush line (did not, obviously), I ended with a link to ScreenRant’s summary of early reviews/previews.  Per the archival aspirations of this blog, I’ve since begun collecting reviews from Venice (I started with Sandy Schaefer’s original list, and kept going with whatever Google turned up in my inbox) and from Telluride.  Toronto’s next (and I’ll tell you about how I waited for three hours only to not see Gravity).

By the way, I feel really good about my decision to avoid all the reviews and promotional interviews and other news alerts. ;)

September update

4 Sep

I could be one of the laziest fanbloggers around. I guess there’s a reason why this blog is called an Alfonso Cuarón Archive. ;)

David Heyman, Alfonso Cuarón, Sandra Bullock, George Clooney, and Jonás Cuarón on the red carpet at Venice

David Heyman, Alfonso Cuarón, Sandra Bullock, George Clooney, and Jonás Cuarón
on the red carpet at Venice

I was going to tell you that I’ve been having a very busy summer, but to tell you the truth, as I began to catch up with the clippings for Gravity from the last month (from Venice and from Telluride), I realised that I don’t really want to read the reviews before I get to see the movie for myself. I’ve been sitting on a copy of the screenplay for months for the same reason.

Fortunately, I am writing from my hometown Toronto, home of the Toronto International Film Festival where Gravity will receive a red carpet Canadian premiere this Sunday evening (September 8), and screen another three times before the festival closing (September 5 to 15).  I’ll do my best to get myself a ticket for one of the screenings, and do some red carpet creeping this weekend. It won’t be long now. :)

Besides Venice, Telluride, and Toronto, Gravity will screen at San Sebastian and Zurich before its commercial release October 4 (and then London and Morelia). I’ll be sure to catch up on archiving before then. In the meantime, I will leave you with this Daily Mail link: good ol’ red carpet fun: Sandra Bullock stuns in a scarlet strapless dress as she joins George Clooney at the Venice Film Festival premiere of Gravity

If you are really desperate to know, ScreenRant began summing up the many positive reviews from Venice (August 28) almost as soon as the critics hit send: ‘Gravity’ Early Reviews: Is Alfonso Cuarón’s Space Thriller a 3D Masterpiece?

Gravity trailer released

9 May

Official Gravity poster unveiled

8 May

This afternoon, WB released the first official poster for Gravity.

Official Gravity poster unveiled

Official Gravity poster unveiled

In cinemas October 4.

Gravity trailer premiers Thursday

7 May

It exists!! Tonight, ET gave us our first glimpse of footage from Gravity, and promised that the first trailer will be coming on Thursday. Watch the preview below.

Gravity will be in cinemas October 4.

Gravity teaser screens at CinemaCon

17 Apr

Last night, Warner Bros. screened – for the first time – a sixty second teaser for Gravity to an audience of cinema owners/industry insiders at at CinemaCon, the Official Convention of The National Association of Theatre Owners. Alex Billington (First Showing) and Peter Sciretta (/FILM) were the first to report with joint videoblog, responding positively to the teaser (that might be an understatement).

 

Besides using adjectives like, “amazing,” “breathtaking,” and “stunning,” Billington pointed out that, “It was probably almost all entirely created on computer,” and also compared the film’s (visual) feel to 2001. Skiretta agreed, “It’s definitely hard sci fi in the way that it’s not action, like Michael Bay shot stuff. It’s like whoa it’s really happening. You’re kind of floating in space.” Read more.

Meredith Woerner (io9) was also at the panel, and described the sixty seconds on screen: Continue reading